Projects

  • The Ancient History Sourcebook is a site developed by Paul Halsall. It contains a list of links to materials (texts and images) for ancient history and civilization courses. It is meant as a companion to the Medieval Sourcebook an extensive collection of Internet resources for Medieval Studies (also maintained by Paul Halsall).

  • The Corinth Computer Project aims at reconstructing the city plan and landscape of Roman Corinth. It has been carried out since 1988 by the Mediterranean Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology under the auspices of the Corinth Excavations of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. The Home Page of the project includes a general description of the project and its goals, methodologies, city plans and bibliographies.

  • The Home Page of (DGE) Greek-Spanish Dictionary provides an overview of the project and a description of the dictionary, as well as its supplementary series. In addition, the page contains links to the DGE Canon Lists of editions and the addenda to the Bibliographical Repertoire of Greek Lexicography and a bibliographical database of Greek Inscriptions, called CLAROS. CLAROS contains near 140.000 records coming from more than 350 epigraphical collections.

  • Corpus Scriptorum Ecclesiasticorum Latinorum (Critical Editions of the Latin Church Fathers) edited by the Austrian Academy of Sciences. This Home Page provides a list of the works edited thus far and other information about the project.

  • The images of the Dead Sea Scrolls originally exhibited by the library of Congress are now available on-line. In addition to the images, the site contains introductory material about the history of the Scrolls and links to readings and other related information.

  • The Florentine Academy of Papyrology and Studies on the Ancient World (Accademia Fiorentina di Papirologia e di Studi sul Mondo Antico)

  • Horace's Villa is the Web site about the excavation of Horace's Villa near Licenza, Italy. The project is undertaken under the institutional sponsorship of the American Academy in Rome and the Archaeological Superintendency for Lazio of the Italian Ministry of Culture. The site offers an overview of the project, a quick tour of the site, including video clips of the villa and some of Horace's poetry read in Latin.

  • The House of Ptolemy is a web site (defined as an annotated infobase by its creator, Adam Philippides) dedicated to the study of the Ptolemies and their world. It contains extensive annotated links to web resources related to the Prolemaic but also Roman and Byzantine rule in Egypt. The site is offered in association with Amazon.com and allows the user to search the Amazon catalog online.

  • The I, CLAVDIVS PROJECT is the result of a collaborative web effort produced at Saint Anselm College, by members of the CL50: Latin Biography Seminar. The goal of this project is to create a web resource which provides source materials and analyses for the BBC production of I, Claudius. The site also includes resources and analyses on other topics relating to the emperor Claudius: his coinage, the imperial cult, and evaluations of Claudius and of his health. For more information, please contact Linda Rulman at lrulman@anselm.edu

  • Interpreting Ancient Manuscripts Web Page This site provides information about the study of New Testament manuscripts.

  • The Oriental Institute Home Page at the University of Chicago provides information pertinent to the study of the ancient Near East. A Virtual Tour of the Museum's galleries with links to related materials is also available.

  • The Ovid Project The University of Vermont has made available an extensive collectIon of17th century engravings inspired by Ovid's Metamorphoses by the German artist Johann Wilhelm Baur. In the future the project will be expanded to include other Ovid holdings included related texts and articles.

  • Pompeii Forum Project, a collaborative venture to study the urban center of Pompeii,includes three components: documentation of the site, data analysis and study of Pompeii's urban history. The Home Page of the project includes links to several site plans and information about the site and the progress of the project.

  • The Rome Project is a collection of resources for the study of Rome compiled by Dr. Neil Goldberg, Archaeologist in Residence at the Dalton School. The site is divided into sections (Literature, Military, Archaeology, Political, Philosophy, Drama, Religion) that contain links to a large number of resources.

  • The ROMULUS PROJECT is an effort to create an electronic Latin literature collection with commentaries. The aim of the Project which is open to collaboration, is to publish a body of texts along with detailed supplementary material, including translation, student-notes, literary discussions, and scholarly references.

  • The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Background information and images about the seven Wonders of the Ancient World and other important ancient monuments (including the Parthenon).

  • Silver Muse Project is a hypertext system to teach and promote research in Latin epic poetry of the early empire. Designed and maintained by Andrew Zissos the site presently contains a wide variety of materials including reading guides, commentaries, essays, and notes about Ovid, Lucan, Valerius Flaccus, Statius and Silius Italicus.

  • School of Historical Studies, Princeton, Institute for Advanced Study. The School of Historical Studies is part of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, an independent, private institution whose mission is to support scholarship and research in historical studies, mathematics, natural sciences, and social science. The web page of the School of Historical Studies offers information about its programs, faculty members, residential fellowships (called memberships) and its library holdings.

  • VROMA is a project recently funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Its aim is to improve and expand the teaching of classical languages and cultures--Roman in particular--through the development and use of technology-assisted (virtual) materials and collaboration between and among undergraduate and secondary school Classics programs. The Home Page of the project contains information about its activities, its participants, links to related projects and some preliminary materials.

  • The Vatican Library page provides information about the project to digitize its manuscripts collection.