Databases

  • The AMPHORAS Project makes available part of the archive collected by Virginia R. Grace at the excavations of the Agora in Athens, as well as some additional materials. It includes a bibliography (with a search index) of scholarly work on finding, identifying, and hypothesizing about Greek and Roman amphoras and the trade they carried, translated passages in ancient Greek literature on the use of amphoras, translations into English of works (or parts of works) published in Russian on amphoras, and links to other Web sites with amphora information and/or images (excavations on land and underwater, etc) and other sources of bibliography.

  • Ancient Greek Music is a site maintained by Stefan Hagel. It contains all published fragments of Ancient Greek music with notes. All of them are recorded under the use of tunings based on ancient theoreticians (of the Pythagorean school, most of them cited by Ptolemaios). Instruments and speed are chosen by the author. The exact sound depends on your hard- and software.

  • Atrium is a site designed and maintained by David Meadows. The site is divided into sections that provide links to various resources, including weekly updates of the "Ancient World on Television" TV programs, Rostra, a page where you can listen to assorted audio programmes in RealAudio format and a Bulletin Board with job postings and conference announcements.

  • Ancient Medicine/Medicina Antiqua is a resource for the study of medicine and medical thought in the Greco-Roman world, from Mycenaean times to the fall of the Roman Empire, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL

  • The Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World created by the Classical Atlas Project

  • Byzantium: Byzantine Studies on the Internet A Home Page with links to reference and teaching materials related to Byzantine Studies.

  • The Canon of Greek Authors and Works is a database containing all the authors and works included in the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae® Digital Library, with complete bibliographical references to printed editions.

  • The Home page of the Cornell Greek Epigraphy Project is a scholarly collection of Greek inscriptions developed by Cornell and the Ohio State University with funding from the Packard Humanities Institute (PHI).

  • Diotima is a site originally developed by Ross Scaife and Suzanne Bonefas. It contains materials (course syllabi, essays, reviews, bibliographies, etc.) for the study of Women and Gender in the Ancient World.

  • The Duke Papyrus Archive provides electronic access to texts about and images of 1400 documentary papyri from ancient Egypt. The site also provides links to the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS) and its Partners.

  • The Greek Manuscript Database from Bates College is produced by Robert W. Allison, Bates College, Lewiston, Maine (rallison@abacus.bates.edu). The purpose of the database is to provide scholars with information about the Philotheite Monastery manuscripts of Mount Athos. It is a division of the Mount Athos Greek Manuscripts Catalogue Project of the Patriarchal Institute for Patristic Studies, Thessaloniki, Greece.

  • The Hellenic Ministry of Culture maintains a server called Ulysses with information and announcements about the actiivities of the Ministry. The server also provides information about Museums, Archaeological sites and contemporary arts in Greece.

  • L'Année philologique on the Internet is a database published by the Société Internationale de Bibliographie Classique, in collaboration with the Society for Classical Studies. It provides annotated bibliographies for all publications in the field of Classics.

  • The Perseus Project Perseus is a Digital Library of resources for the study of the ancient world and beyond. The project started out as a Digital Library of Classical Civilization and has been expanding its holdings to include Greek and Latin Texts and lexicographical resources. The site also includes the electronic version of Liddell-Scott Dictionary Smyth's Greek Grammar (1921) and Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar (Ginn and Company 1903), and many other resources.

  • The Pleiades is an open source site that provides historical geographic information about the ancient world.

  • The Philological Museum is a web site originally created by Dana Sutton at the University of California, Irvine. The site is now maintained under the auspices of the The Shakespeare Institute of the The University of Birmingham. It offers a collection of hypertext editions of NeoLatin Texts with extensive bibliographies.

  • The Roman Law Project maintained by Thomas Rüfner, provides indexed texts, links to other sites on legal history and classics and general information about Roman Law. Most of the information is available in English, Latin, German and Italian.

  • The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) is a research programr at the University of California, Irvine. The TLG has collected and digitized the entire corpus of ancient Greek and Byzantine literature. The full TLG corpus is open to institutions and individuals by subscription. The site, however, provides open access to the TLG bibliographical materials, known as the Canon of Greek Authors and Works and the abridged version of the TLG with more than 100 authors and 1000 works available to browse or search.
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